A Simple Responsive Charting Library Built with SVG

Chartist.js is a simple responsive charting library built with SVG. Chartist’s goal is to provide a simple, lightweight and non-intrusive library to responsive craft charts on your website. It’s important to understand that one of the main intentions of Chartist.js is to rely on standards rather than providing a own solution to the problem which [...]
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Get Nelio A/B Testing for WordPress – 55% off!

NOW ON: Get Nelio A/B Testing for WordPress – 55% off!Expires: September 8, 2014, 11:59 pm ESTWhat’s the best way to test out things on your website? Well, by testing them! Using an A/B Testing method, you can show different content to different users…

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How To Add Page Transitions with CSS and smoothState.js

The following is a guest post by Miguel Ángel Pérez. Miguel has been working at Weblinc on ways to transition pages on websites more gracefully. On single-page applications, we have more opportunity for this since we aren’t fighting the page reload. But traditional sites with page reloads, you can still be quite graceful with some help from CSS and JS. In this article Miguel focuses on setting up the CSS to do this and making it work with his …
How To Add Page Transitions with CSS and smoothState.js is a post from CSS-Tricks

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Effortless Style

Some clever stuff in here regarding styling content that is just regular HTML (perhaps as produced from Markdown). No classes or attributes of any kind, no extra HTML, no JavaScript, no nothin’. Content like that is 1) easier for anyone to produce 2) going to last.
Direct Link to Article — Permalink…
Effortless Style is a post from CSS-Tricks

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Favicons, Touch Icons, Tile Icons, etc. What All Do You Need?

The following is a guest post by Philippe Bernard. Philippe has done research on what it takes to make a favicon (and all the related graphics and markup) such that you are covered with the best quality output everywhere. Spoiler alert: it’s a lot of different graphics and markup. Also full disclosure: Philippe has built a tool to help with it he showcases in the article.
Favicons were introduced in 1999 by Internet Explorer 5 (ref) and standardized …
Favicons, Touch Icons, Tile Icons, etc. What All Do You Need? is a post from CSS-Tricks

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Starting CSS Animations Mid-Way

Say you have a @keyframe animation that animates an element all the way across the screen. From off the left edge to off the right edge. You apply it to multiple elements. But you don’t want all the elements to start at the same exact position.
You can change the animation-delay so that they start at different times, but they will still all start at the same place.
Fortunately, there is a way.
The trick is to use negative animation-delay…
Starting CSS Animations Mid-Way is a post from CSS-Tricks

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CSS Guidelines

High-level advice and guidelines for writing sane, manageable, scalable CSS
Feels like a nice culmination of Harry Roberts work the last several years.
Direct Link to Article — Permalink…
CSS Guidelines is a post from CSS-Tricks

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Sponsored: An RSS Reader for Developers

rssheap is a web-based reader for software developers. You subscribe to tags of interest (CSS, JavaScript, PHP, Ruby, etc.), and we find great articles for you to read. Articles are sorted by how many votes they have to ensure you always read high-quality content.
I think this is a clever idea. It’s easier than a typical RSS reader because there is content there the second you sign up and you find things socially. It’s also better than a typical news …
Sponsored: An RSS Reader for Developers is a post from CSS-Tricks

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What do you do when your design pattern breaks down?

Say you have a module. Every site has modules, right? What do we do when the standard styles for module don’t work in a particular situation and we need to alter them?
What do you do when your design pattern breaks down? is a post from CSS-Tricks

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Design For Community, 13 Years Later

I had heard several people say Design for Community by Derek Powazek is a great book and was published well “before it’s time.” As someone who works on several sites that I very much think of as community sites, I picked it up and gave it a read. Published in 2001, the book is just over 13 years old now. Ancient history for a typical tech book. It is a tech book in that it talks about specific websites and …
Design For Community, 13 Years Later is a post from CSS-Tricks

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